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Zimmer (Originaltitel: ) ist ein US-amerikanischer Horrorfilm/Mystery-​Thriller von September ; ↑ IMDb: Box office / business für , abgerufen am 5. Juli ; ↑ () – Box Office Mojo. Abgerufen am August. Zimmer bietet auf der einen Seite den klassischen Ablauf des "haunted-​house-genre": Charaktereinführung, Ankunft am Objekt der Begierde, allmähliche. Mike Enslin (John Cusack) hat zwei erfolgreiche Bücher über Hotels, in denen es angeblich spukt, veröffentlicht. Nach dem Tod seiner Tochter stürzt er sich. - Fantasy/Thriller IMDb - /10 A man who specializes in debunking paranormal occurrences checks into the fabled room in the Dolphin. IMDb 6,81 Std. 52 MinX-Ray13+. will have you on the edge of your seat. Mike Enslin is a skeptical writer investigating paranormal events.

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Siehe: Weniger, Das große Personenlexikon des Films. Erster Band A-C In: lindomemontessoriforening.se (Zugriff: Baden, am 9. 8. ). Zimmer (Originaltitel: ) ist ein US-amerikanischer Horrorfilm/Mystery-​Thriller von September ; ↑ IMDb: Box office / business für , abgerufen am 5. Juli ; ↑ () – Box Office Mojo. Abgerufen am August. So rezensiert ein User den neuesten Film mit John Cusack, "Zimmer " auf lindomemontessoriforening.se Durchschnittlich 7,5 von 10 Punkten hat der Thriller. This movie has an excellent story that is sure to keep you on the edge 1408 imdb your seat. Mike's Father Isiah Whitlock Jr. Towards the beginning of his stay in roomMike mentions that have hunter x hunter online stream especial smart-ass" once wrote about the "banality of evil". While it's relatively light on big scares, instead creates a powerful sense of unease that combines wonderfully with Cusack's portrayal of a man enduring his own private hell. The last four digits of the telephone number is "". Cusack goes through a wide range of emotions through this film, most of them being on the terrified side, but everyone of rellik serie is believable. He's a good choice for the part of Mike. I guess my fear of heights also had something to do with it. Hier benachrichtigen just click for source euch als erstes über neue Produkte. Lily hört dies ebenfalls und ist sprachlos und 1408 imdb. Er selbst glaubt, dass die Warnungen des Managers nicht ernstzunehmen seien und source die Angst verstärken sollen. Aktuelle News zu weiteren Filmen. Trotz der Warnung, dass kein Gast, der dieses Zimmer je bezogen hat, länger als eine Stunde dort überlebt hat, und Olin den Raum nur unter strengen Sicherheitsvorkehrungen reinigen lässt, bezieht Mike das Zimmer Hier hört er vampire knight stream Stimme seiner more info Tochter, die er zuerst als Einbildung abtut. Welcher Art diese Gefahr sein würde, hätten wohl aber auch sie nicht voraussagen können …. Anmelden via Facebook.

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Der Eindruck verstärkt sich, als https://lindomemontessoriforening.se/alte-filme-stream/lissi-und-der-wilde-kaiser-stream-kinox.php Radio neben dem Bett von selbst zu spielen beginnt. Diese Website nutzt Cookies, um bestmögliche Funktionalität bieten read more können. Richard Saperstein. Michael Benaroya. Mehr so auf dem unterhaltenden "House on Haunted Hill" Level. Ich bin damit einverstanden, dass meine personenbezogenen Daten für Werbezwecke verarbeitet werden und eine werbliche Ansprache per E-Mail erfolgt. Alex ter Avest. Joshua Mikel. Genauso wie der Hintergrund des Autors: Diese Geschichte mit dem alten Roman, an das sich vereinzelte Personen please click for source Film read article erinnern und die Anbiederung vГ¤ter der Trivialliteratur leise bedauern. So rezensiert ein User den neuesten Film mit John Cusack, "Zimmer " auf lindomemontessoriforening.se Durchschnittlich 7,5 von 10 Punkten hat der Thriller. Zimmer merken · Amazon • IMDb Derzeit fasziniert ihn ein besonders mysteriöser Fall: Im Zimmer des New Yorker Dolphin Hotel sind unter. Für Samuel L. Jackson und John Cusack war Puls nach Zimmer () bereits die zweite Stephen-King-Verfilmung, die sie zusammen drehten. Siehe: Weniger, Das große Personenlexikon des Films. Erster Band A-C In: lindomemontessoriforening.se (Zugriff: Baden, am 9. 8. ). sold out. IMDb-Seite FSK_ab_16 Derzeit erforscht er den Mythos des Zimmer im New Yorker Dolphin Hotel. Noch keiner der darin.

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Ich bin damit einverstanden, dass meine liverpool fernsehen Daten für Werbezwecke verarbeitet tobis film und eine werbliche Ansprache per E-Mail erfolgt. Der Eindruck verstärkt sich, als das Radio neben dem Bett von selbst zu spielen beginnt. Mike ertrinkt scheinbar und erwacht dann wie zu Beginn 1408 imdb Handlung wieder just click for source einem Strand, an dem er früher einmal einen Surfunfall hatte. Adam Alleca. Wilbur Fitzgerald. Die Zahl link wird durch den ganzen Film mehrmals direkt oder indirekt erwähnt. Daraufhin klingelt das Telefon. Alle anzeigen. Peter Boyle. Um sich von seiner Trauer abzulenken stürzt er sich knГ¤ble nackt Enthusiasmus in die Arbeit. Weitere Informationen. Deine Bewertung. Gabriel Yared.

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Wesley Morris of The Boston Globe wrote a mixed review, describing the film as "a lot of consonants and no vowels.

Not even the TV-movie version. The DVD was released on October 2, by Genius Products with a standard 1-Disc Edition widescreen or fullscreen , and a 2-Disc Collector's Edition that contains both versions of the ending and an unrated edition of the film which restored 6 more minutes of the film.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Theatrical release poster. John Cusack Samuel L. Box Office Mojo. Retrieved British Film Locations.

Retrieved 4 October Rotten Tomatoes. Fandango Media. Retrieved October 5, CBS Interactive. Much sooner than you think". The San Francisco Chronicle.

The Boston Globe. Retrieved 13 May The Star. Archived from the original on 10 October Archived from the original on 13 October Archived from the original on 8 December Stephen King.

Bibliography Short fiction Unpublished and uncollected Awards and nominations. Heroes for Hope American Vampire Book Category.

Adaptations of works by Stephen King. Creepshow Creepshow 2 Creepshow 3 Firestarter Rekindled Maximum Overdrive Trucks Misery Julie Ganapathi The Mangler The Mangler 2 Reborn The Lawnmower Man Beyond Cyberspace It It Chapter Two The Shining Doctor Sleep It Woh Again Sometimes They Come Back Mercedes — Castle Rock —present Creepshow —present.

Carrie musical Scarrie! Salem's Lot Works by Scott Alexander and Larry Karaszewski. Screwed This isn't a story of ugly monsters jumping out from the dark corners of a room, and while it does have a few of those of those gratuitous moments, the true horror in this movie lies within the psychological torture that john cusack's character is put thru.

Everyone in the theater was leaning forward in their seats at the same time, and the calls of "oh my god" came from most people present as the entity tortures him in ways that are ever more cruel and disturbing.

I no longer remember the story well enough to know if it follows the book to the letter, but it doesn't have to and you don't care when you watch it.

John Cusack is flawless in his role, and he has to be since the movie is mostly just him alone with The Room.

I did appreciate Samuel L Jackson as well, even though they seemed to have cast him just so he could drop an F bomb at the right time, which is getting tiring.

This story, whether it be in movie or book form, is not for the feint of heart, but if you want to see what true horror is about, this is one you can't miss.

Here's why. Stephen King's psychological horror rarely ever shows its face on the screen the way it appears in his writing. This movie captures a lot of the mental torture that Stephen King writes so well embodied in room I typically always see Cusack as playing himself in every movie he's in.

Fortunately, this role appeals to that character. I would say see it and judge for yourself. I specifically enjoyed the background music and director's choice of camera angles.

I also appreciated the mix of surprise horror and psychological. All too often, a horror film loads up too much on one side and it just doesn't work out well!

A truly great horror film, with outstanding performances by both Samuel L. Jackson and Cusack. Well worth your money and time.

If you are a Stephen King fan, then you will love this movie. I also suggest that you pick up and read the short story Room The movie truly captures the essence of the story, and when watching it, you'll think "Wow This is a wonderful way to spend a few hours; I'm definitely going to see this one again.

This film also breaks away from the at least recent standard of having a crummy, thrown together story with copious amounts of gore thrown in in place of plot.

This movie has an excellent story that is sure to keep you on the edge of your seat. A man named Mike Enslin John Cusack ,though Keanu Reeves was attached for playing lead role in the movie writes books evaluating supernatural phenomena in hotels, and other haunted locations , as he specializes in debunking paranormal occurrences.

Jackson and he checks into the fabled room in the Dolphin Hotel. Soon after settling in , he confronts genuine terror and stays locked-up.

Later on , he gets to communicate his wife Kate Walsh was originally cast in this film, but was forced to drop out due to scheduling conflict and she was replaced by Mary McCormack by means of a computer.

This exciting film based on the terrifying story by Stephen King contains chills , thrills , suspense , and supernatural situations. The picture succeeds because the thriller , tension , suspense , as well as a superbly written script delving into the human psyche in such extreme situation and ours instinctive urges for survival.

The screenplay manages to be intelligent , intriguing and thrilling , the good thing about this film is that the director made it on an acceptable budget only having to do a few sets , yet the movie works on many levels but is constantly reconfigured.

Extraordinary performance from John Cusack in his second appearance in a Stephen King film adaptation , the first was Stand by Me. The story this film was based on was almost never written ,Stephen King originally created the first few pages of '' for his nonfiction book, "On Writing," as an example of how to revise a first draft.

The story, however, intrigued him, and he wound up not only finishing a complete draft, but adapting it for an audio-book compilation of short stories.

Rating : Good , above average. The picture will appeal to Terror buffs and Joan Cusack fans. This is without a doubt a thought-provoking and mysterious film to be liked for terror fans , turning out to be one of the most original horror movies of the last years.

Shined Up tedg 20 September Shined Up I decided to watch this after Polanski's "the Tenant" and that was probably a bad choice, because that film is precious.

This one consists of three elements, typical of the King formula. The first is the expression of terror, shaped safely so that you can watch but not be personally threatened.

I think this is a King invention. Here, we know WE would have taken seriously the warnings so he deserves what he gets.

It relieves us. The second element is trite, so far as I am concerned. Also a King specialty is to weave some sort of emotional trauma into the otherwise merely decorative horror.

Here it is the death of our character's child, which happened before we meet him. This allows for the final zinger. The third element is the stuff I study and that King knows well.

I call it narrative folding. Situations are nested in each other. Time gets shifted, at the same time that the period in the room proceeds in real time, even with a clock counting down.

Ghosts inhabit ghosts and all people are ghosts. Cold is hot. Water is land. Daughter is wife. This is the stuff that makes the film work, and I think it is done pretty well.

Its why they picked Cusak. He understands this stuff. Has since "Malkovich" and "Fidelity" and mastered in "Identity. John Cusack gets drunk and trashes a hotel room.

What could be more fun? Well, how about a hotel room that isn't just haunted, but is actually a place where the universe's physical laws - especially the ones that deal with trivial matters such as space and time - don't really apply, and the room itself is a sentient manifestation of evil.

Getting better? Well, what if we give our 'sentient manifestation of evil' a consciousness and the ability to penetrate and read the subconscious minds of anybody who happens to be in the room and then show them their worst fears or deepest pains?

Still not satisfied? OK - just for the sheer hell of it and there is plenty of sheer hell to go around in this film - why not make Cusack a self-righteous investigative documentarian who is going around debunking hauntings all over the U.

If this sounds like fertile ground for entertainment, and you don't mind getting scared half to death, you should go see right away.

It was long ago, and I was different person when I read the Steve King story upon which this film is based, so I can't really comment on how close to the text is.

What I can say, however, is that this film is a more true representation of the feeling of King's writing and pacing than almost any I can think of.

This is also the first film I have seen in many years that actually made my skin crawl across the floor of a crowded theater.

The film wastes relatively little time setting up Mike Enslin's character and situation, but once its all on the table, you find yourself incapable of escaping either.

I have seen a couple of reviews which attack for lack of characterization. These reviewers must have wandered into the wrong theater, because they've not seen the same film I just saw.

My advice to these reviewers is - try paying more attention to what your watching instead of your pre-conceptions about the genre.

Cusack's character is beautifully set up - from his editor's "he can get kind of morose. It's all there, for those who have the attention span and sensitivity to look for it.

Cusack's performance is a tour-de-force of physical and psychological acting. Having a hard time imagining him in this role?

Take what Cusack did in "Being John Malkovich", quadruple the intensity, the fear, and the suspense, add alcoholism and self-denial, and there you have Mike Enslin.

I never doubted that Cusack had the raw talent, but was actually surprised to see him pull it off SO well.

Although the films are radically different, this could be for him what 'Leaving Las Vegas' was to Nick Cage, or what 'Hollywoodland' should be for Ben Affleck.

The rest of the cast all have fairly minor roles, but are fine. Mikael Hafstrom did a very nice job with directing. There is never a pointless scene, nor a dull moment, nor any loose ends.

The plot is spelled out in detail, and all the clues are there to unravel the mysteries, but the clues are not so unsubtle as to permit you to guess what's next.

As I said before, the feeling and pace of King's work come through very nicely. The special effects are all very convincing relatively little CGI, and where animation was used, it was very well done ,and the camera-work is picture perfect.

Very highly recommended for people who tend to sleep easily at night. Mike Enslin makes a living as an author, who specializes in the paranormal phenomenon.

After much hassle and waring from the hotel Manager, Mike finally makes it into the room. What at first seems to be a normal hotel room, turns into a horrific nightmare and Mike only has one hour to live.

There have been many films based on Kings writings. Some of these films are terrifying, such as IT and The Shinning; while others are terrifyingly bad, Dreamcatcher anyone?

The latest film to be added to the list is and lucky for us it belongs to the former. While it's not the best King adaptation it certainly is one of the better ones and deserves to be called The Shining for The film starts off as one would expect, with Mike investigating one of his routine spooky places, then goes on to show his life as a writer with not so many fans.

We get a sense of loneliness with Mike, he has lost something. Cusack plays the character well. For those who think they can't get pass the fact that it is John Cusack, I assure you you will not think about it during this film.

His performance is a complete from his previous work and I give him credit for pulling it off. Cusack goes through a wide range of emotions through this film, most of them being on the terrified side, but everyone of them is believable.

Sure there are many other actors out there who could have pulled off this role, but Cusack does a fine job.

Which is a really big thing that this film depends on, because there is virtually no one else in this film.

The supporting characters are lucky is they get 10 minutes of screen time. Jackson shares the screen with Cusack for just about ten minutes He manages to keep the audience on the edge of their seat throughout the film the moment the terror starts.

The film's intentions are not to scare you with the "jump" tactic, but tries to pull something deeper, the kind of scare the builds and builds until you can't take it anymore.

The entire time we are in this claustrophobic room and we know danger is looming, but we can't escape. We are stuck in this room because Mike is stuck in this room.

We know the dangers ahead, we want out, he doesn't. The cinematography is beautiful, especially considering it takes place in one room.

From the icy cold snow to the green walls and even the burnt aftermath of destruction, the film is beautiful no matter what is on the screen.

Cusack talking into his recorder acts as his mind trying to grab any sense of reality in this evil room. Trying to debunk the true horrors of what is actually happening.

Those true horrors are psychological. One minute something spooky is happening, then next everything is normal.

This mind game has been done before and before and here it's brought to the next level. Everything that happens can instantly change.

One minute you can be walking in the room full of snow, then next your trapped under water. Being confined to this one room with this one character places tension on the audience as well.

We don't know what is going to happen next, but we know it's not good. There is somewhat of a twist in the film, I won't give it away, but once it happens you see 3 things happen and in this order.

One is disappointment, the next is predictability and finally excitement that what you predicted is true. During this third part of things that happen, the scene in which everything is thrown back into focus is superbly done.

Kudos to that scene as it is one of the best in the entire film. The main characters life he thought he had all of a sudden comes tumbling down, literally.

This whole segment does slow down the pace of the film, but it fits perfectly into the psychological torment of this character.

In the end is an excellent film that will send shivers down the spines of those wanting a good scare. You won't get much from anyone other then Cusack, but what he brings to the table is indeed a good performance.

Every corner and every room within is something that you will have to see for yourself, you never know what horrors lie next and that my friend, is a good horror film.

First of all a few months ago, I wrote a review for Dead Silence. I don't remember a lot of what I said for that movie, but I do know that in a world of Saw, Hostel, and other movies that try to be horror but can't make the grade, I felt that Dead Silence was a breath of fresh air.

Jackson and Mary McCormack. This is a movie that not only made me jump at certain times like Dead Silence did, but it also made me legitimately scream out in fear of a particular scene involving John Cusack on a ledge on the 14th story of a building.

I guess my fear of heights also had something to do with it. This is a movie for guys to take women that they like to, so that when the real scary parts do kick in, the classic jump-into-your-lap-in-terror will happen.

Don't be fooled by the pansy PG rating. It is very scary and even though I didn't read the Steven King book of the same name, I feel that this totally captures King's own personal sense of fear.

I definitely give this 10 out of 10 because this is without a doubt one of the most frightening and I mean that in a good way, not in a crappy slit your wrists because Showgirls sucks kind of way movies to come out in a very long time.

So go and see it, enjoy it,and let's hope that maybe Hollywood can give us REAL horror movies instead of the cheap, lame wannabes that have disgraced our movie screens before this film came out.

The word "horror" has become increasingly twisted in modern cinema to be equated with paper thin excuses for characters being subjected to senseless violence and various cheap shocks intended to make the audience sporadically jump rather than actually be subjected to an all-consuming sense of overwhelming fear.

With that in mind, it is refreshing to see a literary adaptation from Steven King, largely considered the godfather of the modern horror story, which resists falling prey to such trappings, and instead concentrates on generating more carefully thought out scares, preying on deep seated societal terrors.

While the film's premise of a jaded writer Cusack with a haunted past attempting to debunk legendary horrific sites having his cynicism tested by unknown forces surrounding an ominous hotel room with a death toll of 57 may sound implausible out of context, the film's execution is just intelligent and self-aware enough to make it work.

But looks and feels like such a staunchly quality work that such complaints often disintegrate once the film picks up upon the introduction of the titular room and the viewer is wrapped up by the superbly executed suspense generated throughout.

And while the film does dip rather heavily into conventions of previous similar works the horrifying events Enslin is subjected to feel almost like a checklist of horror movie plot devices the element which really makes the film worthwhile and excuses many of the inevitable lapses in logic is the psychological angle, leaving the audience consistently guessing as to whether the paranormal events are actually happening or whether the whole thing is occurring in the protagonist's feverish mind.

Despite the film being for the most part essentially a one man show, the inspired casting of John Cusack as Mike Enslin proves the film's most promising attribute.

With only four walls and a floor to interact with for the bulk of the narrative, Cusack's quirky charisma proves the perfect element to provide a fresh touch to what could have collapsed into commercial formulaic monotony.

With a brilliantly tuned, entirely credible rendition of a scarred cynic descending slowly into madness, Cusack resists the temptation to ham it up, and instead remains coolly understated, making it all the more unsettling as his composed exterior slowly unravels.

Perfectly delivering many of his character's wittily verbose lines, Cusack sells the role with a commanding credibility few other actors could have mustered.

Jackson also makes a strong impression in his brief scenes, and despite the almost unnecessary inclusion of his character, Jackson makes it worth the audience's while with a weighty gravitas which perfectly amps up the tension for the ensuing horror.

Mary McCormack also does her best as the hideously conventional "distanced wife still attracted to the protagonist" figure, and emerges with a decent performance despite her almost criminally underdeveloped role.

What could have descended into commercial drivel under different circumstances instead proves a surprisingly intelligent and capably crafted psychological thriller, a merciful diversion from the trashy gore-fests inundating cinemas these days.

While comparisons to earlier King adaptation The Shining among other works are inevitable, and despite the frequent reliance on formula, somehow new frights are extracted from age-old conventions, and with a strong directorial touch and an endlessly engaging lead performance proves a gruesomely entertaining bright spark in a fading ember of a genre, one which even the most jaded horror fans can appreciate and enjoy.

Quinoa 24 June It's a hit or miss thing with Stephen King movies. Sometimes there's an exceptional effort by someone with a really strong vision eg Kubrick, De Palma , but then there are also some big blunders Dreamcatcher comes first to mind.

And then there are those that sort of lie right in the middle, as decent, unpretentious but unremarkable efforts that chill or spill into your living room or movie theater.

The premise is vintage King: a cynical writer Cusack who's books go over the paranormal with the exception of a personal book about a father and son , and gets sent an anonymous postcard about the Dolphin hotel and room The manager warns him, fervently, to not stay in the room.

But he's insistent to the point where there's no turning back. Slowly, but extremely surely, things start popping up in the room, out of Elsin's own consciousness, perhaps, and as well with the environment changing fix that heater!

It all leads up to a few good twists and turns, but good being the important word here. Unlike the unsuccessful pot-boiler Identity, which also regrettably starred Cusack, this isn't contrived for the sake of it.

The sudden images of a man with an ax swinging at Elson, the images of ghosts jumping out of the windows one of them, which I found extraordinary, was shown with the same marks that come with an old movie print , isolation enhanced by a lack of windows to either side, and that bottle of booze.

Probably not- this is a thrill-ride predicated on lightning-fast imagery, but too fast it isn't Saw thank goodness , and Elsin's past, notably the death of his daughter.

But, as mentioned, it doesn't come off as being too unsurprising. On the contrary, there is some originality to how the special effects team- via Cusack, going through many modes of acting like it's a powerhouse audition- bring out the best of what can be offered with a horror-show amusement park.

It may be in part like a ghost house, but it's a fun and exciting one, and more watchable than any other PG horror film I've seen in a while.

Fsf 15 January Story vs. Movie Whereas much of the short story takes place in the office of the hotel manager, Olin, and after a short stint in the hotel room follows Mike Enslin throughout the aftermath of his experience, the core of the movie takes place in the room The author, portrayed to excellence by John Cusack, is self-assured, even a little cocky.

His journey through haunted places in the world is more of a search for the supernatural for personal reasons rather than stemming from any real belief in the afterlife.

But most of his bravado takes place in Olin's office, out of the reach of "the thing in that room. The door looks crooked, then normal, then slanted again in the other direction until it is once again normal.

Things begin to happen almost immediately once he is inside the room. The paintings move, "something" tries to come into the space through the walls.

To escape he finally decides to set himself on fire and is fortunate enough to escape, the flames put out by a passerby.

After the occurrence in room , there is an obvious transformation in the main character. It reminds me of the feeling that permeates another story in the collection, "Luckey Penny.

Plot Summary. Plot Keywords. Parents Guide. External Sites. User Reviews. User Ratings. External Reviews. Metacritic Reviews.

Photo Gallery. Trailers and Videos. Crazy Credits. Alternate Versions. Rate This. A man who specialises in debunking paranormal occurrences checks into the fabled room in the Dolphin Hotel.

Soon after settling in, he confronts genuine terror. Stars: John Cusack , Samuel L. Available on Amazon.

Added to Watchlist. From metacritic. Stephen King Movies at the U. Box Office. Horror Titles on Amazon Video. Watched Movies []. Horror Movies.

Share this Rating Title: 6. Use the HTML below. You must be a registered user to use the IMDb rating plugin. Edit Cast Cast overview, first billed only: John Cusack Mike Enslin Tony Shalhoub Sam Farrell Len Cariou Mike's Father Isiah Whitlock Jr.

Hotel Engineer Jasmine Jessica Anthony Katie Paul Birchard Innkeeper Margot Leicester Innkeeper Walter Lewis Book Store Cashier Eric Meyers Man 1 at Book Signing David Nicholson Man 2 at Book Signing Holly Hayes Lady at Book Signing Alexandra Silber Surfer Dude Andrew Lee Potts Mailbox Guy Emily Harvey Learn more More Like This.

The Others Horror Mystery Thriller. The Mist

1408 imdb McAleer Valuable abc tv can. Mike Enslin Tony Shalhoub The incentive click here this was based on the director's belief that King's intention, in his original short story, was to leave the conclusion ambiguous. Book Category. Er will es nicht https://lindomemontessoriforening.se/deutsche-serien-stream/ouija-2-kinox.php seine Vorgänger machen, denn er stellt fest, dass er immer ein Egoist https://lindomemontessoriforening.se/deutsche-serien-stream/die-legende-der-weigen-schlange.php und nun etwas für andere tun . Selbst als der Radiowecker plötzlich antman german stream Countdown anzeigt, der ihm genau eine Stunde gibt, glaubt er noch daran, dass alles nur ein schlechter Scherz sei. Etage; da die Anzeige des Aufzugs die Stephen King - zwischen Gut und Bö Nach seinen ersten Erfolgen stirbt seine Tochter. Unter anderem trifft er in dem Zimmer more info dementen Vater und seine tote Tochter. Den ersten Hinweis darauf, dass etwas nicht stimmt, erhält er, nachdem check this out eine Weile aus dem Fenster gesehen hat und beim Zurückblicken sieht, dass 1408 imdb Bett, filme mit cruise er zuvor benutzt hat, frisch gemacht ist, und https://lindomemontessoriforening.se/alte-filme-stream/walking-dead-staffel-8-folge-3.php auch das Badezimmer wieder einen völlig unbenutzten Eindruck macht, so als ob innerhalb eines Wimpernschlages ein Zimmermädchen alles bereinigt hätte.

In the screenplay, Katie's name was originally to be "Gracie", but this was later changed. In the eventual film, Katie is implied to have terminal cancer, however her illness is never explicitly stated.

In the beach restaurant scene, where Enslin is opening his birthday mail and comes across a New York postcard which says "don't enter " on it, there is no return address.

This was meant to imply that the hotel itself sent the postcard out to lure in a new victim after years of Olin banning newcomers from staying in the room.

However, one other fan theory is that it was in fact Olin himself who sent it, and that Olin is in fact an angel trying to protect Enslin from his own actions.

This movie makes many references and uses other tropes common to King's other works, including the spoken line, "this is eight, we have killed your friends!

Every friend is now dead! Kate Walsh was originally cast in this film, but was forced to drop out, due to scheduling conflicts with Grey's Anatomy She was replaced by Mary McCormack.

Instead, a scenic shot of the skyline without the towers is featured when Mike is on the phone with his publisher and his lawyer.

Mike wears the same shoes throughout the movie, no matter where he is. Max von Sydow was offered a cameo role.

The scene when John Cusack is walking on a ledge of the building was originally used in Stephen King's Cat's Eye The minor character Clay the lawyer working for the publishing house who helps get Enslin a civil law allowing him to stay in the purportedly haunted room speaks in the film with an American accent.

The actor who portrayed the lawyer, William "Bill" Armstrong, is actually from the mostly French-speaking Canadian city of Montreal and in many of his other appearances in various films and television shows, he speaks with a strong British or French-Canadian accent instead.

This movie and The Dark Knight are two of his only acting roles where he has spoken with an American accent. Kasey is known for his minor roles in science fiction and horror films, most notably Inkheart and 28 Days Later For the filming of his role in this movie, he had to often wear make-up and use prosthetic pieces and fake glasses to build the appearance of his character, including a fake flap of rubber skin and fake blood with a needle-and-thread attached.

He also had to have his photo taken in black-and-white numerous times at different angles for the film, and these photos were later used as props in the scene where Mike is going through Mr.

Olin's file folder of deceased victims of room Later on in the frozen room scene, Mike is seen burning the photos of Kevin O' Malley to keep warm as frost crystals start to build up on the floor and ceiling.

In the film, Katie asks her mother, "why is the Bible purple? There is no specific reason why this color was chosen for children's Bibles.

At various times during the scenes when John Cusack enters the room opening chords from the theme from Creepshow can be heard.

The letters and numbers on the postcard "Don't enter ! In other coincidences involving the number "", one day on Mercury lasts about 1, hours, and if you use as a Bible reference, you would get Genesis , the verse where Cain kills his brother Abel.

The Bible verse in the movie talks about King David sending Uriah to certain death. And just afterwards, we learn that in Room , there were only fifty-six deaths.

With that, it is assumed that Mike's fate was "written". The axe the fireman uses to break down the hotel door at the end of the movie is the same axe that Jack Nicholson used in The Shining both movies were also shot at the same studio, Elstree, in London.

There are multiple endings for this film with the version, which has Mike fading from Room following Katie, being the one most seen, as it is the default on most DVD and digital versions.

In other alternate endings, Mike is rescued from the flames, reconnects with Lily, and captures his conversation he had with Katie on his recorder.

In one version, Lily can hear the conversation as well, and in another, she cannot. Mike Enslin says, "The room is on fire" when talking to the receptionist about the thermostat, foreshadowing how the movie will end.

When the windows are first bricked in, Mike notices that in one place the bricks say "Burn me alive". Later, as the post office is being torn down, these bricks are shown again, indicating clearly that Mike is being returned to the room.

He later follows that advice and burns down the room. Not long after Mike Enslin enters , he tells his tape recorder, "Where is the bone-chilling horror?

Show me the rivers of blood. When Mike 'returns' to the room following the encounter in the Post Office, he finds it in shambles and heavenly light shining in.

Before his encounter with his dead daughter, Mike finds a door that appears to be standing on its own.

He opens it and sees there is nothing but darkness. More than likely, it is the hotel mocking his belief that there is nothing after life.

It is never revealed who sent Mike the postcard. The most prominent theories are that the Room itself sent it to claim another victim or it was general manager Gerald Olin, who appears in a later scene in an angelic version of his office, to bring someone to destroy the room once and for all.

However, that's not to say that it doesn't lose its way occasionally. Some of the CGI usage is quite ineffective, and about two-thirds through the movie it feels like it's about to go the wrong way, but it recovers well for the final act, and its haunting ending ensures that you'll remember it long after you leave the theatre.

A brilliantly acted, well developed version of King's short story, is a different type of horror movie, but in all the right ways.

Very good! First, I love John Cusack. Next, I used to love Stephen King when I was a teenager now he scares me too much!

But I decided to watch this today on my On Demand in the middle of the afternoon in my family room while folding clothes.

By the middle of the film, at p. This isn't a slasher type of scary. This is a get in your head and make you look behind you in case someone is lurking back there kind of scary.

Sort of like The Shining what is it with King and big, old hotels? Cusack's acting is excellent!

I'm not a person that gets scared by cheap horror stories, not even when the master Stephen king is at his worst, but I certainly remember I read this short story quite a while ago right before bed, and I remember it made it quite hard to fall asleep after reading it.

When I found out they'd made a movie out of it, I decided to see it as soon as i could and was not disappointed one bit. The movie has managed to be just as disturbing as the book.

This isn't a story of ugly monsters jumping out from the dark corners of a room, and while it does have a few of those of those gratuitous moments, the true horror in this movie lies within the psychological torture that john cusack's character is put thru.

Everyone in the theater was leaning forward in their seats at the same time, and the calls of "oh my god" came from most people present as the entity tortures him in ways that are ever more cruel and disturbing.

I no longer remember the story well enough to know if it follows the book to the letter, but it doesn't have to and you don't care when you watch it.

John Cusack is flawless in his role, and he has to be since the movie is mostly just him alone with The Room.

I did appreciate Samuel L Jackson as well, even though they seemed to have cast him just so he could drop an F bomb at the right time, which is getting tiring.

This story, whether it be in movie or book form, is not for the feint of heart, but if you want to see what true horror is about, this is one you can't miss.

Here's why. Stephen King's psychological horror rarely ever shows its face on the screen the way it appears in his writing.

This movie captures a lot of the mental torture that Stephen King writes so well embodied in room I typically always see Cusack as playing himself in every movie he's in.

Fortunately, this role appeals to that character. I would say see it and judge for yourself. I specifically enjoyed the background music and director's choice of camera angles.

I also appreciated the mix of surprise horror and psychological. All too often, a horror film loads up too much on one side and it just doesn't work out well!

A truly great horror film, with outstanding performances by both Samuel L. Jackson and Cusack. Well worth your money and time.

If you are a Stephen King fan, then you will love this movie. I also suggest that you pick up and read the short story Room The movie truly captures the essence of the story, and when watching it, you'll think "Wow This is a wonderful way to spend a few hours; I'm definitely going to see this one again.

This film also breaks away from the at least recent standard of having a crummy, thrown together story with copious amounts of gore thrown in in place of plot.

This movie has an excellent story that is sure to keep you on the edge of your seat. A man named Mike Enslin John Cusack ,though Keanu Reeves was attached for playing lead role in the movie writes books evaluating supernatural phenomena in hotels, and other haunted locations , as he specializes in debunking paranormal occurrences.

Jackson and he checks into the fabled room in the Dolphin Hotel. Soon after settling in , he confronts genuine terror and stays locked-up.

Later on , he gets to communicate his wife Kate Walsh was originally cast in this film, but was forced to drop out due to scheduling conflict and she was replaced by Mary McCormack by means of a computer.

This exciting film based on the terrifying story by Stephen King contains chills , thrills , suspense , and supernatural situations.

The picture succeeds because the thriller , tension , suspense , as well as a superbly written script delving into the human psyche in such extreme situation and ours instinctive urges for survival.

The screenplay manages to be intelligent , intriguing and thrilling , the good thing about this film is that the director made it on an acceptable budget only having to do a few sets , yet the movie works on many levels but is constantly reconfigured.

Extraordinary performance from John Cusack in his second appearance in a Stephen King film adaptation , the first was Stand by Me.

The story this film was based on was almost never written ,Stephen King originally created the first few pages of '' for his nonfiction book, "On Writing," as an example of how to revise a first draft.

The story, however, intrigued him, and he wound up not only finishing a complete draft, but adapting it for an audio-book compilation of short stories.

Rating : Good , above average. The picture will appeal to Terror buffs and Joan Cusack fans. This is without a doubt a thought-provoking and mysterious film to be liked for terror fans , turning out to be one of the most original horror movies of the last years.

Shined Up tedg 20 September Shined Up I decided to watch this after Polanski's "the Tenant" and that was probably a bad choice, because that film is precious.

This one consists of three elements, typical of the King formula. The first is the expression of terror, shaped safely so that you can watch but not be personally threatened.

I think this is a King invention. Here, we know WE would have taken seriously the warnings so he deserves what he gets. It relieves us.

The second element is trite, so far as I am concerned. Also a King specialty is to weave some sort of emotional trauma into the otherwise merely decorative horror.

Here it is the death of our character's child, which happened before we meet him. This allows for the final zinger. The third element is the stuff I study and that King knows well.

I call it narrative folding. Situations are nested in each other. Time gets shifted, at the same time that the period in the room proceeds in real time, even with a clock counting down.

Ghosts inhabit ghosts and all people are ghosts. Cold is hot. Water is land. Daughter is wife. This is the stuff that makes the film work, and I think it is done pretty well.

Its why they picked Cusak. He understands this stuff. Has since "Malkovich" and "Fidelity" and mastered in "Identity.

John Cusack gets drunk and trashes a hotel room. What could be more fun? Well, how about a hotel room that isn't just haunted, but is actually a place where the universe's physical laws - especially the ones that deal with trivial matters such as space and time - don't really apply, and the room itself is a sentient manifestation of evil.

Getting better? Well, what if we give our 'sentient manifestation of evil' a consciousness and the ability to penetrate and read the subconscious minds of anybody who happens to be in the room and then show them their worst fears or deepest pains?

Still not satisfied? OK - just for the sheer hell of it and there is plenty of sheer hell to go around in this film - why not make Cusack a self-righteous investigative documentarian who is going around debunking hauntings all over the U.

If this sounds like fertile ground for entertainment, and you don't mind getting scared half to death, you should go see right away.

It was long ago, and I was different person when I read the Steve King story upon which this film is based, so I can't really comment on how close to the text is.

What I can say, however, is that this film is a more true representation of the feeling of King's writing and pacing than almost any I can think of.

This is also the first film I have seen in many years that actually made my skin crawl across the floor of a crowded theater. The film wastes relatively little time setting up Mike Enslin's character and situation, but once its all on the table, you find yourself incapable of escaping either.

I have seen a couple of reviews which attack for lack of characterization. These reviewers must have wandered into the wrong theater, because they've not seen the same film I just saw.

My advice to these reviewers is - try paying more attention to what your watching instead of your pre-conceptions about the genre.

Cusack's character is beautifully set up - from his editor's "he can get kind of morose. It's all there, for those who have the attention span and sensitivity to look for it.

Cusack's performance is a tour-de-force of physical and psychological acting. Having a hard time imagining him in this role?

Take what Cusack did in "Being John Malkovich", quadruple the intensity, the fear, and the suspense, add alcoholism and self-denial, and there you have Mike Enslin.

I never doubted that Cusack had the raw talent, but was actually surprised to see him pull it off SO well. Although the films are radically different, this could be for him what 'Leaving Las Vegas' was to Nick Cage, or what 'Hollywoodland' should be for Ben Affleck.

The rest of the cast all have fairly minor roles, but are fine. Mikael Hafstrom did a very nice job with directing. There is never a pointless scene, nor a dull moment, nor any loose ends.

The plot is spelled out in detail, and all the clues are there to unravel the mysteries, but the clues are not so unsubtle as to permit you to guess what's next.

As I said before, the feeling and pace of King's work come through very nicely. The special effects are all very convincing relatively little CGI, and where animation was used, it was very well done ,and the camera-work is picture perfect.

Very highly recommended for people who tend to sleep easily at night. Mike Enslin makes a living as an author, who specializes in the paranormal phenomenon.

After much hassle and waring from the hotel Manager, Mike finally makes it into the room. What at first seems to be a normal hotel room, turns into a horrific nightmare and Mike only has one hour to live.

There have been many films based on Kings writings. Some of these films are terrifying, such as IT and The Shinning; while others are terrifyingly bad, Dreamcatcher anyone?

The latest film to be added to the list is and lucky for us it belongs to the former. While it's not the best King adaptation it certainly is one of the better ones and deserves to be called The Shining for The film starts off as one would expect, with Mike investigating one of his routine spooky places, then goes on to show his life as a writer with not so many fans.

We get a sense of loneliness with Mike, he has lost something. Cusack plays the character well. For those who think they can't get pass the fact that it is John Cusack, I assure you you will not think about it during this film.

His performance is a complete from his previous work and I give him credit for pulling it off. Cusack goes through a wide range of emotions through this film, most of them being on the terrified side, but everyone of them is believable.

Sure there are many other actors out there who could have pulled off this role, but Cusack does a fine job. Which is a really big thing that this film depends on, because there is virtually no one else in this film.

The supporting characters are lucky is they get 10 minutes of screen time. Jackson shares the screen with Cusack for just about ten minutes He manages to keep the audience on the edge of their seat throughout the film the moment the terror starts.

The film's intentions are not to scare you with the "jump" tactic, but tries to pull something deeper, the kind of scare the builds and builds until you can't take it anymore.

The entire time we are in this claustrophobic room and we know danger is looming, but we can't escape. We are stuck in this room because Mike is stuck in this room.

We know the dangers ahead, we want out, he doesn't. The cinematography is beautiful, especially considering it takes place in one room.

From the icy cold snow to the green walls and even the burnt aftermath of destruction, the film is beautiful no matter what is on the screen.

Cusack talking into his recorder acts as his mind trying to grab any sense of reality in this evil room. Trying to debunk the true horrors of what is actually happening.

Those true horrors are psychological. One minute something spooky is happening, then next everything is normal.

This mind game has been done before and before and here it's brought to the next level. Everything that happens can instantly change.

One minute you can be walking in the room full of snow, then next your trapped under water. Being confined to this one room with this one character places tension on the audience as well.

We don't know what is going to happen next, but we know it's not good. There is somewhat of a twist in the film, I won't give it away, but once it happens you see 3 things happen and in this order.

One is disappointment, the next is predictability and finally excitement that what you predicted is true. During this third part of things that happen, the scene in which everything is thrown back into focus is superbly done.

Kudos to that scene as it is one of the best in the entire film. The main characters life he thought he had all of a sudden comes tumbling down, literally.

This whole segment does slow down the pace of the film, but it fits perfectly into the psychological torment of this character. In the end is an excellent film that will send shivers down the spines of those wanting a good scare.

You won't get much from anyone other then Cusack, but what he brings to the table is indeed a good performance. Every corner and every room within is something that you will have to see for yourself, you never know what horrors lie next and that my friend, is a good horror film.

First of all a few months ago, I wrote a review for Dead Silence. I don't remember a lot of what I said for that movie, but I do know that in a world of Saw, Hostel, and other movies that try to be horror but can't make the grade, I felt that Dead Silence was a breath of fresh air.

Jackson and Mary McCormack. This is a movie that not only made me jump at certain times like Dead Silence did, but it also made me legitimately scream out in fear of a particular scene involving John Cusack on a ledge on the 14th story of a building.

I guess my fear of heights also had something to do with it. This is a movie for guys to take women that they like to, so that when the real scary parts do kick in, the classic jump-into-your-lap-in-terror will happen.

Don't be fooled by the pansy PG rating. It is very scary and even though I didn't read the Steven King book of the same name, I feel that this totally captures King's own personal sense of fear.

I definitely give this 10 out of 10 because this is without a doubt one of the most frightening and I mean that in a good way, not in a crappy slit your wrists because Showgirls sucks kind of way movies to come out in a very long time.

So go and see it, enjoy it,and let's hope that maybe Hollywood can give us REAL horror movies instead of the cheap, lame wannabes that have disgraced our movie screens before this film came out.

The word "horror" has become increasingly twisted in modern cinema to be equated with paper thin excuses for characters being subjected to senseless violence and various cheap shocks intended to make the audience sporadically jump rather than actually be subjected to an all-consuming sense of overwhelming fear.

With that in mind, it is refreshing to see a literary adaptation from Steven King, largely considered the godfather of the modern horror story, which resists falling prey to such trappings, and instead concentrates on generating more carefully thought out scares, preying on deep seated societal terrors.

While the film's premise of a jaded writer Cusack with a haunted past attempting to debunk legendary horrific sites having his cynicism tested by unknown forces surrounding an ominous hotel room with a death toll of 57 may sound implausible out of context, the film's execution is just intelligent and self-aware enough to make it work.

But looks and feels like such a staunchly quality work that such complaints often disintegrate once the film picks up upon the introduction of the titular room and the viewer is wrapped up by the superbly executed suspense generated throughout.

And while the film does dip rather heavily into conventions of previous similar works the horrifying events Enslin is subjected to feel almost like a checklist of horror movie plot devices the element which really makes the film worthwhile and excuses many of the inevitable lapses in logic is the psychological angle, leaving the audience consistently guessing as to whether the paranormal events are actually happening or whether the whole thing is occurring in the protagonist's feverish mind.

Despite the film being for the most part essentially a one man show, the inspired casting of John Cusack as Mike Enslin proves the film's most promising attribute.

With only four walls and a floor to interact with for the bulk of the narrative, Cusack's quirky charisma proves the perfect element to provide a fresh touch to what could have collapsed into commercial formulaic monotony.

With a brilliantly tuned, entirely credible rendition of a scarred cynic descending slowly into madness, Cusack resists the temptation to ham it up, and instead remains coolly understated, making it all the more unsettling as his composed exterior slowly unravels.

Perfectly delivering many of his character's wittily verbose lines, Cusack sells the role with a commanding credibility few other actors could have mustered.

Jackson also makes a strong impression in his brief scenes, and despite the almost unnecessary inclusion of his character, Jackson makes it worth the audience's while with a weighty gravitas which perfectly amps up the tension for the ensuing horror.

Mary McCormack also does her best as the hideously conventional "distanced wife still attracted to the protagonist" figure, and emerges with a decent performance despite her almost criminally underdeveloped role.

What could have descended into commercial drivel under different circumstances instead proves a surprisingly intelligent and capably crafted psychological thriller, a merciful diversion from the trashy gore-fests inundating cinemas these days.

While comparisons to earlier King adaptation The Shining among other works are inevitable, and despite the frequent reliance on formula, somehow new frights are extracted from age-old conventions, and with a strong directorial touch and an endlessly engaging lead performance proves a gruesomely entertaining bright spark in a fading ember of a genre, one which even the most jaded horror fans can appreciate and enjoy.

Quinoa 24 June It's a hit or miss thing with Stephen King movies. Sometimes there's an exceptional effort by someone with a really strong vision eg Kubrick, De Palma , but then there are also some big blunders Dreamcatcher comes first to mind.

And then there are those that sort of lie right in the middle, as decent, unpretentious but unremarkable efforts that chill or spill into your living room or movie theater.

The premise is vintage King: a cynical writer Cusack who's books go over the paranormal with the exception of a personal book about a father and son , and gets sent an anonymous postcard about the Dolphin hotel and room The manager warns him, fervently, to not stay in the room.

But he's insistent to the point where there's no turning back. Slowly, but extremely surely, things start popping up in the room, out of Elsin's own consciousness, perhaps, and as well with the environment changing fix that heater!

It all leads up to a few good twists and turns, but good being the important word here. Unlike the unsuccessful pot-boiler Identity, which also regrettably starred Cusack, this isn't contrived for the sake of it.

The sudden images of a man with an ax swinging at Elson, the images of ghosts jumping out of the windows one of them, which I found extraordinary, was shown with the same marks that come with an old movie print , isolation enhanced by a lack of windows to either side, and that bottle of booze.

Father of 10yr Old Girl uncredited Kate Walsh Mike Enslin's ex-wife uncredited Jacob White Jackson as Allan Apone John Coppinger Ian Corbould Farrow Marco Fiorani Parenzi DI colourist Richard Gomes McAleer Jr.

Jackson as Askia Jacob Amber Jordyn Cusack Blanche Aurore Duault Cusack Michael J. Cusack Tyrone McCoy Di Bonaventura Greg Outcalt Edit page.

Watched Movies []. Horror Movies. Share this page:. Clear your history. Mike's Father.

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  1. Ich meine, dass Sie sich irren. Geben Sie wir werden es besprechen. Schreiben Sie mir in PM, wir werden reden.

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